This is the busy season for most photographers...even hobbyist like me. Maybe it's spring combined with seniors preparing to send out announcements. Or the approach of Mother's Day and all those sweet little newborns that arrived five and six months ago starting to sit up on their own. Whatever the reason it can be a little hectic.

So yesterday I did something I rarely do. The kids and I went to the beach with some friends and I did not take my camera. This is seriously not the norm ~ the beach is my happy place and I always take it with me when we go. I feel like the landscape of it is always changing so I never get the same picture twice.

But my third eye is pretty focused with several sessions this week and I wanted to give it a rest.

So there was no picture snapped of sugar white sand.

The almost clear sea glass color of the gulf wasn't digitally recorded. The white foam of the waves received the same fate.

There are no pictures of Abby's burnished gold hair hanging in a wet braid down her back.

Claire's happy blue eyes looked directly into mine as she excitedly showed me her seashell treasures.

Instead of pulling out my camera I dug my toes into that sugar white sand and dipped them into the gulf.

My eyes followed the black shadow of the seagulls as they glided low across the sky.

Then I closed my eyes as I lifted my face to feel the sun and took in a deep deep breath of clean salt air.

I didn't use that third eye at the beach today but I saw it with all of me and I took a hundred photos in my mind.

Everyone of us is a photographer in a sense. We all take pictures and store them in the album of our mind. For some of us the album is full of all the black and white have-to-do-this moments. For others it's the images of bitterness, their sepia tone coloring our relationships. Others may have the high color intensity of memories that almost hurt our eyes because we keep them so sharp and in focus and we never forget...good or bad we never allow them to fade.

What we really need is to balance those bright vivid moments so that we aren't so blinded by a few experiences that we miss other moments. We need to let the sepia of bitterness continue to fade and blur until it's unrecognizable. Our black and white reality needs to be softened by the well balanced correctly exposed colors of everyday life that have a hue and tone of thankfulness.


2 Comments

  1. i really like this Marty...I too am always using my third eye, but sometimes like you, i resist and experience it - not often enough, but it's a great reminder to me to do this more often. You created a photo with your words. Lovely.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Carol! That's what I was hoping for.

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